Cognos Planning – Contributor

I’m going to start this post assuming you have already CREATED a model / library in Cognos Analyst and are familiar with Cognos Analyst models in terms of modeling and creating an application. Once the Analyst model / library is ready, the end users must be able to access the cubes, enter data, manipulate data and perform all manner of tasks. This is done via the web-based interface which is basically where contributor comes in. The Contributor Application is basically a published version of the Analyst model. As a published model, it is different or enhanced from the model / library in the following ways:

1. Provides a web-based front-end to the end users to access the application(s)
2. e.List creation and maintenance (Analyst can use a dummy placeholder for modeling purpose)
3. Allows user access and security settings
4. Data Validations
5. Translations (or Aliases in Hyperion Planning jargon as far as I know)

Essentially the model from analyst is copied into a contributor application so the underlying structure is the same. The other options like security, e.List, data validations, etc. which are not part of Analyst are managed here and the application is made available to the end users.

The modeler or designer can continue to work on Analyst without impacting the published application until the changes are synced to the contributor application. Even then the changes are not reflected until the Development version is migrated to the Production version (a process that is known as GTP – Go To Production).

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Cognos Planning: Contributor – Basic Understanding

I’m going to start this post assuming you have already CREATED a model / library in Cognos Analyst and are familiar with Cognos Analyst models in terms of modeling and creating an application. Once the Analyst model / library is ready, the end users must be able to access the cubes, enter data, manipulate data and perform all manner of tasks. This is done via the web-based interface which is basically where contributor comes in. The Contributor Application is basically a published version of the Analyst model.
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Creating a dimension with Interface tables

For the ones who have started using BPMA to manage the outline in Hyperion Planning, there are two options to create the dimensions. Either make the .ads file or populate the Interface tables with the relevant information.

Maintaining and developing an .ads file is rather cumbersome and updating the Master version takes considerably more time as compared to pulling the data from the Interface tables.

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Limitations on size of dense dimensions for optimum performance

Designing an Essbase DB comes with a lot of practice and experience. There are however some basic tips & tricks that we should be aware of. One common question I’ve come across in my inbox relates to the ideal block size of an Essbase DB.

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Clueless Guide: Difference between BI Reports and ERP Reports

Business Intelligence (BI) is just a fancy term for reporting. If I ask a business user what a report is, he/she will be able to bring up an image in their head of what it is and explain it as well. To make it easier to understand BI, just consider it as a reporting mechanism. That begs to the question why we have a fancy term like BI for a simple concept like reports?

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Clueless Guide

Being a technology consultant I get to meet a lot of people everyday. I have found that some are very knowledgeable about technology and software and how a particular product will be able to help them; whereas some have been totally clueless about new products, technologies and concepts that can make their business more efficient. I have decided to write a series of articles called the ‘Clueless Guide’ that will basically break down the technologies and concepts in a simpler form.

Hyperion: Why is there a startup order for the services?

I’ve often been asked this question from people who are new to Hyperion. To best understand the reason behind the specific sequence in which the Hyperion services are started we must understand the architecture of the product suite.
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